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(Source: Brain Pickings) Ray Bradbury, on the Secret of Life, Work, and Love.

Photo by Geordie Wood.

Photo by Geordie Wood.

Photograph by Janine Mizera.

Photograph by Janine Mizera.

Beck by Autumn De Wilde.
It’s impossible to make art for everyone. There are too many conflicting goals and there’s far too much noise. Art for everyone is mediocre, bland, and ineffective. If you don’t pinpoint your audience, you end up making your art for the loudest, crankiest critics. And that’s a waste. Instead, focus on the audience that you choose, and listen to them, to the exclusion of all others. Go ahead and make this sort of customer happy, and the other guys can go pound sand.

Seth Godin from ‘Lynchpin

From ‘Son' by Christopher Anderson.
Photograph by Davis Ayer.

Photograph by Davis Ayer.

If you aren’t making mistakes, you aren’t taking enough risks [..][Many people] think it means accept failure with dignity and move on. The better, more subtle interpretation is that failure is a manifestation of learning and exploration. If you aren’t experiencing failure, then you are making a far worse mistake: You are being driven by the desire to avoid it. And, for leaders especially, this strategy — trying to avoid failure by out-thinking it — dooms you to fail […] In a fear-based, failure-averse culture, people will consciously or unconsciously avoid risk. They will seek instead to repeat something safe that’s been good enough in the past. Their work will be derivative, not innovative. But if you can foster a positive understanding of failure, the opposite will happen.

— Ed Catmull (cofounder of Pixar) with journalist Amy Wallace in Creativity, Inc: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Photograph by Signe Vilstrup.

Photograph by Signe Vilstrup.

William S. Burroughs talks about writing and art. He was born 100 years ago, today.