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The point I think the billions of Image clones and Marvel clones have not figured out, is that all you have to offer that makes you unique, that sets you apart from everybody else, is the stuff that only you can do. So you might as well find out what that is rather than trying to do the stuff that anybody could do, because anybody can do it. You’re infinitely replaceable.

Neil Gaiman on artists imitating what’s popular in the comic book industry. Part of his interview with Los Bros Hernandez in The Love And Rockets Companion: 30 Years (and Counting).

Photo by Sarah Moon.

Photo by Sarah Moon.

People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances within our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive. That’s what it’s all finally about, and that’s what these clues help us to find within ourselves.
Photo by Matthieu Soudet.

Photo by Matthieu Soudet.

Photograph by Jeff Hahn.

Photograph by Jeff Hahn.

Photo by Dennis Auburn.

Photo by Dennis Auburn.

Many have argued that the origins of photography are to be discovered well before Fox Talbot and Daguerre fixed an image in the 1830s, going back to the realization by earlier generations of scientists and dreamers that certain light sensitive substances can actually register the shadows and silhouettes of objects. Children still embrace this primal photographic magic when they make blueprints of leaves and flowers. Sommer would argue that the essence of photography is not its capacity to mirror the world, but its capacity to fix that fleeting image. Many people can see clearly, but it is the photographer who registers the experience of sight, turning images into afterimages. At the end of the day, the photographer is the sensitive surface, receiving the impact and imprint of an experience. What is photography without the honesty and inevitability of the sensitized surface? Photographers may well do without the print’s slow emergence in the chemical bath in the darkroom, but as a guiding metaphor the sensitive surface remains as honest and inevitable as ever.
I take photographs to see what something looks like as a photograph.